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History of Times Square & Coney Island

Luna Park and Surf Ave., Coney Island, New York, 1912

Luna Park and Surf Ave., Coney Island, New York, 1912

New York City
Friday, July 5, 2013

Architectural historian Barry Lewis explores the development of Times Square and Coney Island. In an illustrated talk, Mr. Lewis argues that these two entertainment centers served to break down the traditional barriers between the upper and lower classes within New York City. The New-York Historical Society hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, July 15, 2013 at 1:06pm (ET)

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