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History of Presidential Debates

Kansas City, Missouri
Saturday, August 3, 2013

Former PBS NewsHour anchor and 12-time presidential debate moderator Jim Lehrer joins journalism professor Lee Banville and Kansas City Public Library director Crosby Kemper in a conversation about the history of presidential debates. He also discusses his 2011 memoir “Tension City” and his post-debate interviews with many of the presidential and vice-presidential candidates of the last 40 years. This event was held at the Kansas City Public Library and co-sponsored with the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Updated: Monday, August 5, 2013 at 10:59am (ET)

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