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History of Papermaking

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 22, 2014

Journalist and self-described “Bibliophile” Nicholas Basbanes talks about his book, “On Paper: The Everything of Its Two-Thousand-Year History.” He begins in China where paper was invented and visits some of the last remaining by-hand paper makers. He also explores how papermaking has evolved and how it has been used to record history, make laws, and create currency. Nicholas Basbanes is the author of eight books about books and book culture, including the 1995 best-seller “A Gentle Madness.” This program was held at the National Archives in Washington, DC. 

Updated: Friday, February 28, 2014 at 1:50pm (ET)

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