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History of Opposition to Slavery & Human Trafficking

New Haven, Connecticut
Saturday, January 19, 2013

A panel of history professors examines 18th and 19th century slavery abolition movements and early legislative efforts opposing prostitution & sex trafficking or so-called “white slavery.” The panel considers how these historic examples might be applied to the problem of modern day human trafficking & forced labor. This event was held at Yale University and hosted by the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Abolition and Resistance.

Updated: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 12pm (ET)

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