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History of Obituaries & How to Craft Them

Obituary of Patrick Carr who died in the Boston Massacre

Obituary of Patrick Carr who died in the Boston Massacre

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 8, 2014

Obituary writers from the Washington Post and the New York Times join author Janice Hume for a discussion on the history of obituaries. They explore three broad questions; how are obituaries constructed? Who gets an obituary? And what do they tell us about our society and our history? This panel was part of the American Historical Association’s annual conference held in Washington, DC in January.  

Updated: Saturday, February 8, 2014 at 1:56pm (ET)

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