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History of Islam in America

Title Page of Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an, Library of Congress

Title Page of Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an, Library of Congress

Atlanta
Friday, April 25, 2014

From the Organization of American Historians 2014 annual meeting in Atlanta, Denise Spellberg of the University of Texas at Austin and Kambiz GhaneaBassiri of Reed College talk about the history of Islam in the United States.

Updated: Saturday, April 26, 2014 at 8:31am (ET)

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