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History of Arlington National Cemetery

150th Anniversary of the Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery in 1865 with Wooden Grave Markers

Arlington National Cemetery in 1865 with Wooden Grave Markers

Arlington, Virginia
Sunday, June 15, 2014

The first military burial at Arlington National Cemetery took place on May 13, 1864. C-SPAN visited the cemetery with Robert Poole, author of "On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington National Cemetery" to hear stories from his book about the final resting place for some 400,000 Americans. This program was originally recorded in November 2009.

 

Updated: Tuesday, June 17, 2014 at 10:29am (ET)

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