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History Bookshelf: The Strong Man

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Washington, DC
Saturday, March 1, 2014

On March 1, 1974, the “Watergate Seven” – advisors and aides to President Nixon - were indicted by a grand jury for conspiring to hinder the investigation of the Watergate scandal. One of the seven was John Mitchell, U.S. attorney general from 1969 to 1972 and a long-time confidant and aide to President Nixon. Mitchell served two years in federal prison for his involvement in the Watergate cover-up and was the highest-ranking American official ever convicted on criminal charges. Fox News Washington correspondent James Rosen spent almost two decades researching and writing  “The Strong Man: John Mitchell and the Secrets of Watergate.”
 

Updated: Thursday, February 20, 2014 at 3:19pm (ET)

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