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History Bookshelf: The Monuments Men

Debuts February 8 at Noon ET

Members of the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program

Members of the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program

New Orleans
Saturday, February 8, 2014

The 2009 book “The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History” tells the story of a group of about 400 service members and civilians who at the end of World War II were tasked with locating and protecting art treasures stolen by the Nazis. Author Robert Edsel is the founder and CEO of the Monuments Men Foundation, which seeks to honor the legacy of the men and women who served in the “Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives section” in Europe, and also continues searching for the hundreds of thousands of still missing paintings, sculptures, documents, books, and other cultural items.
 

“The Monuments Men” is now an American-German feature film co-production directed by and starring George Clooney. The film's release date is February 7th. This talk by Robert Edsel was recorded in September 2009 at the National World War Two Museum in New Orleans.
 

Updated: Monday, February 10, 2014 at 10:16am (ET)

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