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History Bookshelf: My Father at 100: A Memoir

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 1, 2014

Ron Reagan, the youngest son of former President Ronald Reagan, recounts his father’s personal life and political career. Ronald Reagan, who died on June 5, 2004, at the age of 93, would have been 100 on February 6, 2011. Ron Reagan remembered his father at Politics & Prose Bookstore in Washington, D.C., on January 25, 2011. He responded to questions from members of the audience.

Updated: Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 12:54pm (ET)

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