All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

History Bookshelf: My Father at 100: A Memoir

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 1, 2014

Ron Reagan, the youngest son of former President Ronald Reagan, recounts his father’s personal life and political career. Ronald Reagan, who died on June 5, 2004, at the age of 93, would have been 100 on February 6, 2011. Ron Reagan remembered his father at Politics & Prose Bookstore in Washington, D.C., on January 25, 2011. He responded to questions from members of the audience.

Updated: Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 12:54pm (ET)

Related Events

Lectures in History: Ronald Reagan's Political Campaigns
Saturday, December 29, 2012     

Craig Shirley - author of two books on Ronald Reagan - guest lectures at President Reagan's alma mater, Eureka College in Illinois.  Mr Shirley discusses the career and political campaigns of the nation's 40th president.

Ronald Reagan 1981 Presidential Inauguration
Sunday, January 20, 2013     

Ronald Reagan's first presidential inauguration took place on January 20, 1981. It was the first inauguration held at the Capitol’s West Front. This film is courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

President Reagan's Berlin Address
Monday, July 1, 2013     

President Reagan called on Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to "tear down this wall" in this address at the Brandenburg Gate in West Berlin on June 12, 1987.

President Reagan's Farewell Address
Saturday, January 11, 2014     

Twenty-five years ago, on January 11th, 1989, President Reagan delivered his last address to the nation from the Oval Office, reflecting on his two terms as 40th President of the United States and two “triumphs” he was most proud of: the economic recovery of the 1980s and the recovery of morale in America. Reagan died in 2004.

Life Portraits: Ronald Reagan
Sunday, January 12, 2014     

In this program from our 1999 "American Presidents: Life Portraits" series we focused on Ronald Reagan's life and career. Historians discussed his early film career, inolvement in California politics, his penchant for a Western lifestyle, and the assassination attempt on his life. They also talked about his anti-terrorism efforts and dealings with Russian President Gorbachev. The program, which includes archival audio recordings and film, was recorded at Rancho del Cielo, his home in California.

Battle of Bladensburg & Burning of Washington
Today     

A panel of authors and scholars looks back 200 years to the Battle of Bladensburg and the Burning of Washington, DC, which took place August 24, 1814, during the War of 1812.

American Artifacts: Burning of Washington River Tour
Today     

Steve Vogel, author of "Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks that Saved the Nation" tells the story of the August 24, 1814 burning of Washington by taking us on a river tour with his boat.  Mr. Vogel argues that the waterways were key to the British commanders, who thought that capturing and burning the city might bring the War of 1812 to an end.

The Life of Milton Friedman
Today     

Economist Mark Skousen reflects on the life of Nobel Prize winning economist Milton Friedman and his contributions to the study of economics – especially his work to re-establish the American economy following World War II. Skousen also reflects on his personal relationship with Friedman and the economist’s influence on his own career. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event. 

Historical Accuracy of the Movie “Lincoln”
Friday     

Dickinson College professor Matthew Pinsker dissects Stephen Spielberg’s movie “Lincoln,” analyzing what is fact and what is Hollywood fiction. Professor Pinsker goes into detail about the historical significance of the events the movie portrays, but also highlights areas where Mr. Spielberg exercised his artistic freedom. This talk is a portion of the 2014 Civil War Symposium hosted by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society. 

British Burning of Washington
Thursday     

Two hundred years ago on August 24th, 1814, British soldiers routed American troops at the Battle of Bladensburg just outside of Washington, DC. The victory left the nation’s capital wide open to British forces, who marched into the city and burned down the White House and U.S. Capitol building. In this program, learn more about the Burning of Washington during the War of 1812 from author and historian Anthony Pitch at an event hosted by the Smithsonian Associates. 

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN's Video Library
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org