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History Bookshelf: Maury Klein

Detroit Arsenal Tank Plant in Warren, Michigan (1940's)

Detroit Arsenal Tank Plant in Warren, Michigan (1940's)

Prospect, Connecticut
Saturday, January 18, 2014

Maury Klein talks about his book, “A Call to Arms: Mobilizing America for World War II”, in which he recounts the creation of the American arsenal during World War II. The author reports that the United States' military resources were depleted at the start of the war, and only through the collaboration of men and women throughout the country, did factories produce 325,000 aircraft by 1945 and at the height of production one B-24 bomber per hour.  Maury Klein spoke at the Prospect Public Library in Prospect, Connecticut.

Updated: Thursday, January 9, 2014 at 2:37pm (ET)

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