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History Bookshelf: John Shaw

Sen. Richard Lugar (R-IN)

Sen. Richard Lugar (R-IN)

Indianapolis, Indiana
Saturday, October 5, 2013

Richard Lugar served Indiana in the U.S. Senate from 1977-2013.  He lost his 2012 re-election bid.  John Shaw recounts the political career of the six-term Republican senator.  Mr. Shaw focuses on Senator Lugar's foreign policy work, from his chairmanship of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to his deliberations on arms control.  The author also touches on the 2012 campaign that saw Sen. Lugar defeated by a Republican challenger in the state’s primary.

Updated: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 at 5:04pm (ET)

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