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History Bookshelf: Francine Prose

Francine Prose

Francine Prose

Washington, DC
Saturday, July 7, 2012

Francine Prose talks about her book, "Anne Frank: The Book, The Life, The Afterlife" which examines the impact that Anne Frank's diary has had on the history and understanding of the Holocaust.  Anne Frank was born on June 12, 1929 in Germany.  On July 6, 1942 thirteen year old Anne Frank and her family went into hiding from the Nazis in Amsterdam.  In 1944 they were caught.  In March of 1945 Anne Frank died of typhus in Bergen-Belson concentration camp.  Anne Frank's diary was published in 1947.

Updated: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 at 12:04pm (ET)

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Book TV (late 2012)