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History Bookshelf: Daniel & Ruth Boorstin Interview

February 1999 Program

Ruth and Daniel Boorstin (left) with John Cole of the Center for the Book

Ruth and Daniel Boorstin (left) with John Cole of the Center for the Book

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 25, 2014

The late Daniel Boorstin was Librarian of Congress from 1975 to 1987.  His wife Ruth Boorstin was a poet and author who edited many of his books. She died in December of 2013. C-SPAN's Book TV interviewed the couple in their Washington, DC home to talk about writing, about history, and their marriage and careers.

Updated: Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 1:07pm (ET)

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