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History Bookshelf: Bruce Watson

Freedom Summer Student Civil Rights Activists (1964)

Freedom Summer Student Civil Rights Activists (1964)

Jackson, Mississippi
Saturday, July 13, 2013

Bruce Watson recalls the "Freedom Summer" of 1964 when over 700 college students arrived in Mississippi to register African American voters and create alternative schools in black communities throughout the state.  Their work was met with resistance, and the author describes indiscriminate beatings, the burning and bombing of black homes, businesses and churches, and the abduction and murder of three volunteers.

Updated: Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 4pm (ET)

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