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History Bookshelf: “1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus”

2005 Book TV Event

Charles C. Mann's

Charles C. Mann's "1491"

Washington, DC
Saturday, March 15, 2014

Science journalist Charles Mann's book, “1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus" describes the cultures and technological accomplishments of the millions of native peoples of the so-called “New World.” Synthesizing the latest in scientific research, he argues against the commonly-taught version of the Americas before Columbus, insisting that it was far from a sparsely populated wilderness but rather a highly cultivated land populated by advanced peoples.

Updated: Monday, March 10, 2014 at 11:58am (ET)

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