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Herbert Hoover & the Jewish Vote

President Herbert Hoover

President Herbert Hoover

New York City
Saturday, December 29, 2012

History Professor Sonja Schoepf Wentling analyzes the relationship between President Herbert Hoover and prominent Jewish political leaders in the 1920s. Hoover’s work after World War I to coordinate humanitarian aid to Polish Jews helped him earn credibility with Jewish leaders, who in turn supported his presidential bid. This event took place at Fordham University Law School.

Updated: Thursday, December 20, 2012 at 12:07pm (ET)

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