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HUD Secretary and EPA Head Speak at NAN Convention

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson

Washington, DC
Friday, April 13, 2012

The National Action Network’s 14th annual convention continued today with a panel discussion examining the impact of race in politics in 2012.

Guests at the discussion included Meet the Press moderator David Gregory;  Nia-Malika Henderson, a Washington Post political writer; Alfred C. Liggins III, CEO of Interactive One and Radio One and April Ryan, senior White House correspondent for America Urban Radio, among others.

Following the panel, Secretary Shaun Donovan of Housing and Urban Development spoke about the affect housing market and foreclosures have had on the African-American community while highlighting key Obama initiatives.

Afterwards, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson gave remarks about the negative effects an unhealthy envrionment has on the African-American community .

The National Action Network is a civil rights organization founded by Rev. Al Sharpton in 1991. The convention, which began on Wednesday, brings together leaders in civil rights, government, business and media and within the church to discuss issues of civil rights.
 

Updated: Friday, April 13, 2012 at 12:37pm (ET)

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