All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Gun Ownership & the Nonviolent Civil Rights Movement

Demonstrators protest police brutality, 1965

Demonstrators protest police brutality, 1965

Washington, DC
Sunday, June 15, 2014

Author and journalist Charles Cobb discusses gun ownership by nonviolent civil rights groups, and why gun carrying supporters protected leaders like Martin Luther King Jr.    

Updated: Monday, June 16, 2014 at 9:52am (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Birmingham Civil Rights Movement
Sunday, September 15, 2013     

Each week American Artifacts takes viewers into archives, museums and historic sites around the country. In this program, a return to the Birmingham of the 1950s and 60s, as we visit some of the iconic places around the city associated with the Civil Rights movement. Our guide is Barry McNealy, youth leadership program coordinator at the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, and a local high school history teacher. Stops include Bethel Baptist Church, A.G. Gaston Motel and 16th Street Baptist Church, among others.

Lectures in History: Civil Rights Movement
Saturday, August 10, 2013     

Fairfield University professor Yohuru Williams looks at the Civil Rights era and compares it to other movements in American history. He also argues that the teaching of the Civil Rights Movement is too focused on leaders like Martin Luther King Jr., excluding the multitude who sacrificed and worked for equality, and especially minimizing the role of women. He points out the contributions of such activists as Daisy Bates, Jo Ann Robinson and Rosa Parks as being overlooked. This class took place at Fairfield University in Connecticut.
 

Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" Speech
Sunday, August 25, 2013     

Clarence Jones is a former speechwriter and adviser to Martin Luther King Jr. and co-authored the book, "Behind the Dream: The Making of the Speech that Transformed a Nation."  He describes what it was like to work closely with Dr. King, how the Letter from Birmingham Jail was written, and the long journey to the March on Washington and King’s “I Have a Dream Speech.” He also discusses the power of political speeches and some of his favorite writers. The program was recorded at Stanford University.

Lectures in History: Satchel Paige, Negro Leagues Baseball & Civil Rights
Saturday, April 12, 2014     

University of Miami history professor Donald Spivey teaches a class on African American baseball pitcher Satchel Paige and how he and those involved in the Negro Leagues contributed to the fight for civil rights. 

American Artifacts: Race & Civil Rights in Alabama
Sunday, February 9, 2014     

In this American Artifacts program, we visit the Birmingham Public Library for a look at items related to the history of race and civil rights in Alabama. These include a slave baptismal register, bomb fragments & shrapnel from one of the Ku Klux Klan bombings of Fred Shuttlesworth's Bethel Baptist Church, and the jail docket listing the arrest of Martin Luther King Jr. during the 1963 Civil Rights demonstrations.

Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement
Sunday, May 18, 2014     

From the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library, three leaders of the Civil Rights Movement share personal anecdotes of moments of triumph and despair during their struggle for equality.  

Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall
Sunday     

Historians and law professors met at the University of Baltimore Law School to discuss Mick Caouette’s film “Mr. Civil Rights: Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP.” They explored Marshall’s early law career as well as his work in the South to expand voting rights for African Americans. We also hear about his arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court, and how he became the first African American appointed to the highest court in the land.  

The Presidency: John Quincy Adams
Sunday     

A conversation with author Fred Kaplan about his biography, “John Quincy Adams: American Visionary.” Although he was not remembered for being a great president, Fred Kaplan argues that John Quincy Adams was one of the most intellectual commanders in chief, and also the best Secretary of State in American history. The New-York Historical Society hosted this event. 

Herbert Hoover, Henry Wallace & Cold War America
Sunday     

American History TV traveled to the Library of Congress Kluge Center in Washington, DC, which was established in 2000 and endowed by philanthropist John W. Kluge. The center welcomes over 100 scholars every year to pursue their research interests at one of the world's largest libraries. We spoke with Vanderbilt University lecturer Kevin Kim about his upcoming book about Herbert Hoover and Henry Wallace, and their impact on America's Cold War policy.

Naval Warfare in the American Revolution
Sunday     

Historian Dennis Conrad of the Naval History and Heritage Command discusses how strategies used by colonial naval captains contributed to the success of the American Revolution. Mr. Conrad also describes how ships from the colonies – then called the Continental Navy-- fought not just in the Atlantic but also saw action as far away as the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean. This event was sponsored by the Society of Cincinnati and took place at the Anderson House in Washington D.C. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

C-SPAN Radio