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Gideon v. Wainwright Supreme Court Case

U.S. Supreme Court

U.S. Supreme Court

Gainesville, Florida
Saturday, October 26, 2013

50 years ago, the landmark Supreme Court decision in Gideon v. Wainwright established that in criminal cases, the state must provide an attorney to defendants who cannot afford one. In 1963, Bruce Jacob was one of the attorneys who argued the case before the Supreme Court; now he is a professor at Stetson University College of Law. He discusses the intricacies of the case of a drifter named Clarence Gideon who was charged with theft and unable to afford an attorney. Jacob also recounts the daunting experience and unique challenge of arguing before the Supreme Court Justices.

Updated: Saturday, October 26, 2013 at 5:42pm (ET)

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