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Gerald Ford 1976 Presidential Campaign Election Eve Program


Saturday, November 3, 2012

This program was produced by the Republican National Committee in support of President Gerald Ford’s 1976 presidential campaign. It aired on national TV the evening before Election Day. President Ford went on to lose that election—and the presidency—to Democratic candidate Jimmy Carter.

Updated: Monday, November 5, 2012 at 10:31am (ET)

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