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George Washington’s Presidential Library

The Fred W. Smith National Library at Mount Vernon

The Fred W. Smith National Library at Mount Vernon

Washington, DC
Saturday, July 20, 2013

Americans will soon get a better look at the nation’s first president and his papers. At a recent news conference, the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association announced that the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington will open this coming September. The privately-funded presidential library at Mount Vernon, George Washington’s Virginia estate, will house the President’s rare books, manuscripts and precious documents, and function as a center for scholarly research and leadership training.

Updated: Saturday, July 20, 2013 at 5:17pm (ET)

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