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George Washington's "New Room" Restoration

Courtesy Gavin Ashworth

Courtesy Gavin Ashworth

Mount Vernon, Virginia
Sunday, May 11, 2014

We go to George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate to see what he called the “New Room” – which, after 14 months, $600,000, and extensive scientific and scholarly analysis, is once again a room he would recognize. The Mount Vernon Ladies Association, owners of Washington’s estate since 1858, believe that a room long thought to be used for dining was actually more of a statement room – one designed to project Washington’s own sense of himself as a gentleman farmer, Revolutionary War general and first president of the United States. We get an up close look at Mount Vernon’s grandest room and hear from the team of historians and curators behind its restoration. This event was hosted by Mount Vernon.

Updated: Monday, May 12, 2014 at 11:58am (ET)

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