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George Washington's Surprise Attack

Washington's Crossing of the Delaware River

Washington's Crossing of the Delaware River

Washington, DC
Saturday, April 5, 2014

Historian Phillip Thomas Tucker discusses his most recent book, "George Washington's Surprise Attack."  At the beginning of the Revolutionary War, Washington relied solely on conventional warfare tactics and suffered a series of defeats. Tucker argues that Washington's crossing of the Delaware River and the Battle of Trenton altered the course of the war.

Updated: Monday, April 7, 2014 at 4:50pm (ET)

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