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George Wallace, Segregation & Politics

George Wallace

George Wallace

Birmingham, Alabama
Saturday, November 16, 2013

When George Wallace was governor of Alabama during the 1960s, he fiercely supported segregation in his state, famously standing in the school house door to prevent the enrollment of black students at the University of Alabama. Wallace later retracted these views and apologized for his segregationist policies. In this program, historians Dan Carter, Glenn Eskew and Angela Lewis discuss the life and legacy of Wallace. They look at whether political concerns or racism motivated Wallace to oppose integration. This event took place at the Birmingham Public Library in Birmingham, Alabama.
 

Updated: Saturday, November 16, 2013 at 12:35pm (ET)

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