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General George Washington's Defeat at the Battle of Brandywine

"Nation Makers" by Howard Pyle

New York City
Monday, December 30, 2013

Author Bruce Mowday talks about the Battle of Brandywine – a lesser known American Revolutionary War battle which ended in a British victory over General George Washington at Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania in what was the largest land battle of the conflict.

Updated: Monday, December 30, 2013 at 10:34am (ET)

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