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Gender, Sexuality & the 2012 Elections

New York, NY
Friday, November 9, 2012

Columbia University hosted a discussion on women’s issues in this year’s election and how those issues may be addressed during the upcoming Congress.

Panelists focused on women's health, reproductive rights, marriage equality, poverty and political participation. They also considered what issues should be at the top of the feminist and LGBT political agenda and how these communities can best affect change in the new presidential administration.

Speakers included Professor and MSNBC host Melissa-Harris Perry and Columbia University Professor Patricia Williams along with Rebecca Traister, Salon.com Columnist and others.

Updated: Monday, November 12, 2012 at 2:13pm (ET)

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