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Gen. Ulysses S. Grant & the Army of the Potomac

Lexington, Virginia
Saturday, June 9, 2012

Two historians discuss the generalship of Ulysses S. Grant. They focus on Grant’s efforts in leading the Union Army of the Potomac against Robert E. Lee and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, and talk about how other officials admired and praised Grant’s abilities. This is the third in a series of sessions from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The Virginia Military Institute hosted the conference.
 

Updated: Monday, June 11, 2012 at 10:38am (ET)

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