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Gen. Robert E. Lee & the Army of Northern Virginia

Lexington, Virginia
Saturday, October 20, 2012

Two historians discuss Robert E. Lee’s leadership during the Civil War. They consider Lee’s education, his work as a general, and his ability to maintain troop morale under challenging circumstances. This is the second in a series of sessions we’re airing from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The Virginia Military Institute hosted the conference.

Updated: Saturday, October 6, 2012 at 1:11pm (ET)

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