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From Emancipation to the Great Migration

From Jacob Lawrence's Migration Series, Phillips Collection

From Jacob Lawrence's Migration Series, Phillips Collection

New York City
Monday, January 21, 2013

Panelists, including historian Eric Foner, talk about the impact of the Emancipation Proclamation on the African American community during the Civil War, Reconstruction, and through the Great Migration. Two actors also perform a reading of author Isabel Wilkerson’s book, “The Warmth of Other Suns.” The National Constitution Center and New York Public Radio co-hosted this event at the Greene Space in New York City.

Updated: Monday, January 21, 2013 at 7:58pm (ET)

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