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Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Jewish Community

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt

New York City
Saturday, November 17, 2012

Rafael Medoff, director of the David S. Wyman Institute for Holocaust Studies, looks at President Franklin Roosevelt’s relationship with the American Jewish community, and efforts by Jewish leaders to influence administration policy during the Nazi era. The Wyman Institute at Fordham University in New York City hosted this event.


 

Updated: Saturday, November 3, 2012 at 12:38pm (ET)

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