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Forum on 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

President Kennedy Meets with March on Washington Leaders, 1963

President Kennedy Meets with March on Washington Leaders, 1963

Boston
Sunday, August 18, 2013

As the nation prepares to mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in late August, the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston convened a forum to recall the event and its legacy. Congressman John Lewis – who was among those speaking at the Lincoln Memorial before the multitude gathered in 1963 – delivered the keynote address. You'll also see film clips from the March on Washington, and hear the recollections of former U.S. Information Agency photographer Rowland Scherman, who captured some of the day’s most iconic images.   

Updated: Monday, August 19, 2013 at 12:18pm (ET)

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