All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Financial Booms & Busts in U.S. History

Crowd at New York's American Union Bank in 1931

Crowd at New York's American Union Bank in 1931

New York City
Saturday, October 20, 2012

A panel of economic historians looks at the impact of boom and bust periods in U.S. financial history, with a focus on the banking industry in New York City. The panelists also comment on the current financial situation. The Museum of the City of New York hosted this event.

Updated: Saturday, October 20, 2012 at 12:39pm (ET)

Related Events

Lectures in History: American Abundance in the 1950s and ‘60s
Saturday, December 24, 2011     

This week we join Thomas Zeiler at the University of Colorado in Boulder for a class on American abundance and prosperity in the 1950s and early ‘60s. Mr. Zeiler has written about and teaches courses on American foreign relations, war and U.S. society, globalization, and baseball.

Lectures in History: Politics & Economics in the 1970s
Saturday, September 15, 2012     

History professor Judith Stein teaches a graduate-level seminar on politics and economics in the 1970s. In this class, Professor Stein examines the 1974 resignation of President Nixon and Jimmy Carter’s defeat of President Ford in the 1976 Presidential Election. Also discussed are President Carter’s attempts to deal with inflation and the energy crisis. The class took place at the City University of New York Graduate Center.

History of the Gold Standard
Saturday, August 4, 2012     

A discussion hosted by the New-York Historical Society about the origins, benefits, and drawbacks of the use of the gold standard. Panelists talk about the economic circumstances that led to the U.S. departure from the gold standard, and arguments for reinstating it.

Economic Crisis in American History
Sunday, May 6, 2012     

History professors Jessica Lepler and Alice O'Connor discuss the Panic of 1837 and other financial meltdowns and how these relate to the 2008 crisis.

Senate Investigation of Wall Street During the Great Depression
Saturday, January 29, 2011     

From 1932 to 1933, the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking and Currency investigated the causes of the Wall Street Crash of 1929. As part of the National Archives’ “Know Your Records” series, two specialists from the Center for Legislative Archives discuss the findings of that Senate investigation.

Eric Rauchway, Author, "The Great Depression & the New Deal"
Saturday, February 14, 2009     

Eric Rauchway, Author, “The Great Depression & the New Deal,” on the actions taken by the Roosevelt administration to alleviate the national economic collapse.

American Artifacts: Treasury Building Restoration
Sunday, April 17, 2011     

Treasury Department Curator Richard Cote takes us on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Cash Room, the Salmon Chase Suite, and the President Andrew Johnson Suite. Each of these rooms has recently been restored as part of an ongoing renovation effort funded by the Treasury Historical Association. This is the first half of a two part program.

American Artifacts: U.S. Department of Treasury Building Part 2
Sunday, May 15, 2011     

Curator Richard Cote leads us on a tour of the Treasury building to learn about a long-term restoration project begun in 1986. In the second half of a two-part program, we see Secretary Timothy Geithner's office, a suite of rooms that has served Treasury Secretaries since 1910. We also learn about the restoration of the ornate West Dome and the gold gilding that had once been painted over and forgotten.

U.S. Capitol Grounds in Spring
Thursday     

Architect of the U.S. Capitol Stephen Ayers talks about the U.S. Capitol grounds in springtime.

George Washington's "New Room" Restoration
Sunday     

We go to George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate to see what he called the “New Room” – which, after 14 months, $600,000, and extensive scientific and scholarly analysis, is once again a room he would recognize. The Mount Vernon Ladies Association, owners of Washington’s estate since 1858, believe that a room long thought to be used for dining was actually more of a statement room – one designed to project Washington’s own sense of himself as a gentleman farmer, Revolutionary War general and first president of the United States. We get an up close look at Mount Vernon’s grandest room and hear from the team of historians and curators behind its restoration. This event was hosted by Mount Vernon.

Share This Event Via Social Media
American History TV
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org