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Film of Franklin D. Roosevelt in Wheelchair Discovered

General MacArthur, FDR, & Admiral Nimitz in Pearl Harbor

General MacArthur, FDR, & Admiral Nimitz in Pearl Harbor

Washington, DC
Sunday, July 14, 2013

Franklin College Journalism Professor Ray Begovich talks with us about his discovery of 1944 US Navy footage of FDR in a wheelchair while aboard the USS Baltimore docked at Pearl Harbor. Begovich found the film at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland while researching a book on  the president’s director of the Office of War Information. During the interview, we show the film that Begovich found and talk to him about its significance. The Roosevelt White House concealed the president’s wheelchair use from the American public.

Updated: Friday, July 12, 2013 at 6:01pm (ET)

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