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FDR, La Guardia and the Making of Modern New York

Mayor La Guardia Leaving the White House, 1935

Mayor La Guardia Leaving the White House, 1935

New York City
Saturday, October 26, 2013

This is a discussion about the political alliance between President Franklin D. Roosevelt and New York mayor Fiorello La Guardia and how their partnership changed the landscape of the city. Their shared ideology and close personal relationship resulted in such Depression-era public works projects as the Lincoln Tunnel and La Guardia Airport. Mason Williams – author of “City of Ambition: FDR, La Guardia and the Making of Modern New York” – details how New York became a hub of New Deal activity under their stewardship.

Updated: Saturday, October 26, 2013 at 5:43pm (ET)

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