All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

FBI Agent Robert Hanssen: Russian Spy

Washington, DC
Saturday, October 19, 2013

From 1979 to 2001, FBI agent Robert Hanssen sold top secret information to Soviet and Russian intelligence agencies. In this discussion, former FBI agent Mike Rochford, author David Wise, and psychiatrist David Charney detail the investigation and capture of Hanssen, who was convicted and is serving time in prison. The speakers describe Hanssen’s contradictory nature, a self-described “patriot” who became a double agent. This event was hosted by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC.

Updated: Saturday, October 19, 2013 at 12:04pm (ET)

Related Events

FBI Oral History Project
Saturday, July 6, 2013     

FBI officials past and present recount their responsibilities within the bureau and explain the FBI Oral History Heritage Project. The speakers share some of the stories they recorded with agents and officials, including long-time FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. They also recall some of their own experience working in the field. The National Archives in College Park, Maryland, hosted this discussion.

J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI
Sunday, October 28, 2012     

FBI Historian John Fox examines the career of J. Edgar Hoover, who served as FBI director for 48 years - from 1924 until 1972. Fox talks about Hoover’s role in domestic security, and the changing perception of Hoover as a result of decisions he made toward the end of his career. This speech is from the Raleigh Spy Conference, held at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, North Carolina.

"Operation Gold” Berlin Spy Tunnel
Saturday, May 18, 2013     

“Operation Gold” was a 1950s project conducted by the CIA and the British Intelligence Service to tap into Soviet communications by tunneling from West Berlin into East Berlin, Germany. Known as “Operation Stopwatch” by the British, the 1,500 foot tunnel was active for eleven months, and netted about 40,000 hours of East German telephone conversations - even though the KGB knew about the tunnel before it was built. Retired CIA officer Lou Mehrer tells the story of the Berlin Tunnel at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library & Museum in West Branch, Iowa.

1972 U.S. Spy Satellite Retrieval
Saturday, December 1, 2012     

David Waltrop of the CIA’s Historical Division talks about the retrieval of a U.S. spy satellite from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. In 1972, the CIA and U.S. Navy gathered the remains of the Hexagon Spy Satellite, which contained images of Soviet missile sites and was considered highly important to American intelligence. The retrieval was classified up until August 2012. This event was part of the Raleigh Spy Conference.

Ernest Hemingway As A World War II Spy
Sunday, March 11, 2012     

Before he won the Pulitzer Prize for his writing, World War I veteran and author Ernest Hemingway served as a spy for the United States during the second World War. Recently, the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC hosted military and intelligence historian Nicholas Reynolds for a look at the larger than previously acknowledged impact of Hemingway's espionage during the war.

AHTV: Atomic Testing Museum On Spy Planes of Groom Lake
Saturday, December 26, 2009     

For decades, people have reported seeing UFO’s in the Nevada desert section of Area 51. And for decades, the government denied the existence of a military base in the same location. This past year, the Atomic Testing Museum in Las Vegas held a forum with former Air Force and CIA personnel involved in top-secret spy plane projects.

International Spy Museum Panel on “America on a Need to Know Basis"
Tuesday, April 14, 2009     

The panel exchanges views on the contrast between the public’s right to knowledge and the government’s duty to safeguard national security information. Participants include Peter Earnest, former chief of the CIA office responsible for FOIA, privacy, and litigation issues in the clandestine service and Mike Levin, former chief of information policy at the National Security Agency.

Lectures in History: Jews in the Progressive Era
Saturday     

Georgetown University Professor Jonathan Ray looks at the lives of American Jews in the Progressive Era, including questions about Jewish assimilation into the wider American culture. He discusses Jewish support of socialism and organized labor, as well as issues of discrimination against Jews in the workplace and in society. He also examines ethnic, racial and religious differences within the Jewish community itself. 

The Search for Missing World War II Servicemen
Saturday     

Author and New York Times Magazine contributing writer, Wil Hylton talks about his book, “Vanished: The Sixty-Year Search for the Missing Men of World War II." According to Mr. Hylton, the United States is committed to bringing all service members home – even though there are some 83,000 missing. 73,000 of the missing were World War II servicemen. In this talk, Mr. Hylton tells the story of the search for one American bomber plane that disappeared over the tiny Pacific island of Palau in 1944 and he also describes the work being done to find all the missing of World War II. This event was hosted by the New York Public Library. 

The Civil War: Gen. A.J. Smith’s Guerrillas & the Battle of Nashville
Saturday     

Texas Christian University history professor Steven Woodworth talks about Union General A.J. Smith’s guerrillas—a contingent of the Army of the Tennessee—and their involvement and decisive action in the Battle of Nashville in December of 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN Gifts (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org