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Exploration & the Cattle Drive Era, 1865-1893

Enid, Oklahoma
Saturday, November 16, 2013

Author and historian Byron Price explores the history of the cattle drive in the American West in the years following the Civil War. Because of the rigorous nature of the job, many men would participate in only a few drives; rarely did any complete more than five. Mr. Price is the author of several books on the West and is director of the Charles M. Russell Center for the Study of Art of the American West at the University of Oklahoma. This event was hosted by the Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center.

Updated: Saturday, November 16, 2013 at 12:37pm (ET)

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