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Experts Discuss Attitudes Toward Arabs and Muslims

Washington, DC
Monday, October 8, 2012

The Brookings Institution hosts a discussion on the findings of a University of Maryland public opinion poll on American attitudes toward Arabs and Muslims.

The poll was conducted following recent violent protests in the Arab world that erupted in response to a film denigrating Islam.

Participants included: Hisham Melhem, Al Arabiya News Washington Bureau Chief; William Galston, Brookings Institution Senior Fellow; and Shibley Telhami, principal investigator of the poll and the Anwar Sadat chair for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland.

Updated: Monday, October 8, 2012 at 12:31pm (ET)

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