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Ernest Withers: Civil Rights Photographer and FBI Spy

Photo taken by Ernest Withers in 1968

Photo taken by Ernest Withers in 1968

Washington, DC
Monday, November 4, 2013

Photographer Ernest Withers covered some of the most important figures and events of the 1960s civil rights movement. Trusted and respected within the movement, Withers was given complete access to prominent Civil Rights leaders such as Martin Luther King, Jr. However, during this time Withers was secretly spying on the Civil Rights movement for the FBI.

In this program, we hear about the double life of Ernest Withers from the team of journalists and attorneys that discovered and fought to reveal his FBI involvement. They detail their investigations into Withers, and elaborate on the history and motivations behind the FBI's spying on the Civil Rights movement. 

      

Updated: Wednesday, January 1, 2014 at 2:48pm (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)