All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Ending Slavery in America

Slaves Waiting for Sale - Richmond, Virginia, 1861

Slaves Waiting for Sale - Richmond, Virginia, 1861

Washington, DC
Monday, October 14, 2013

Historian and professor David Blight discusses the events leading up to the emancipation of slaves in America. He examines the political maneuvering that occurred during the Civil War, and the complex motivations behind Abraham Lincoln’s decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. He also recounts the reactions to the Proclamation, from northern abolitionists, to southern slaveholders, to the slaves themselves. The German Historical Institute in Washington, DC hosted this event as part of a lecture series on how societies around the world abolished slavery.

Updated: Monday, October 14, 2013 at 5:21pm (ET)

Related Events

Slavery: From Scholarship to Public Interpretation
Saturday, May 25, 2013     

How is slavery interpreted at historic sites – and how has that interpretation evolved over the last quarter century? Those were among the questions addressed at a conference convened at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello to consider the history of slavery scholarship and how it makes its way to the American public.

Teaching About Slavery
Saturday, May 18, 2013     

Harvard Law School history professor Annette Gordon-Reed is the author of two books exploring the story of Sally Hemings and her family’s ties to Thomas Jefferson. Her 2009 book, “The Hemingses of Monticello,” won a Pulitzer Prize. At the National Council for History Education National Conference in Richmond, Virginia, professor Gordon-Reed discusses teaching about slavery, as well as the research that led to her books.

Interpreting Slavery at Historic Sites
Sunday, April 21, 2013     

A panel discusses how slavery is represented and reconstructed at places like Thomas Jefferson's Monticello and James Monroe’s home, Ash Lawn-Highland. They also delve into the problems of excavation, restoration, and historic interpretation at these sites. This event was hosted by the Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello.

Lectures in History: Lincoln, Slavery & Emancipation
Saturday, April 20, 2013     

President Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation on September 22nd, 1862. It ordered the emancipation of all slaves in any Confederate state that did not return to the Union by January 1st, 1863. No Confederate states returned, and Lincoln signed and issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. Professor George Forgie discusses the evolution of Lincoln’s thinking on slavery, and the political and legal factors Lincoln considered when issuing the Emancipation Proclamation. This class is from the University of Texas at Austin.

Slavery and Emancipation in Photographs
Saturday, February 16, 2013     

The National Archives hosted this look at how newly freed slaves were portrayed in photographs after the Emancipation Proclamation and the end of the Civil War. We also see photographs from before the war that help distinguish how African Americans were later depicted.

History of Opposition to Slavery & Human Trafficking
Saturday, January 19, 2013     

A panel of history professors examines 18th and 19th century slavery abolition movements and early legislative efforts opposing prostitution & sex trafficking or so-called “white slavery.” The panel considers how these historic examples might be applied to the problem of modern day human trafficking & forced labor. This event was held at Yale University and hosted by the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Abolition and Resistance.

The Civil War: Slavery, Emancipation & Reconciliation
Saturday, November 17, 2012     

History professor Caroline Janney addresses how slavery and emancipation played into the process of post-war reconciliation. She also discusses the experiences and memories of Northern and Southern veterans in the war’s aftermath. Ms. Janney spoke at the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College.

White House Correspondents' Association
Sunday     

We hear from journalists and historians about the evolution of the White House Correspondents’ Association, which is marking its centennial. The organization was founded in 1914 after President Woodrow Wilson threatened to limit the access of White House reporters. The panel also discusses how social media has affected coverage of the president.

Recorded History of the U.S. Congress
Sunday     

2014 marks the 225th anniversary of the first meeting of the U.S. Congress at Federal Hall in New York City. As part of the annual meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government, past and present House and Senate historians came together to discuss the state of congressional history. They explored current projects to retrieve old records from individual members of Congress as well as the many differences between the first Congress and Congress today. 

American Artifacts: Making & Breaking Secret Codes
Sunday     

American History TV visits the National Cryptologic Museum - located on the campus of the National Security Agency, just north of Washington, DC - to learn about the making and breaking of secret codes, and their role in U.S. history. This two-part program includes a look at the breaking of the German “Enigma” code and the Japanese diplomatic and naval codes in World War II. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Video Playlist

Related Resources

American History TV
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org