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Encore Q&A: Lonnie Bunch, Founding Director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture

Washington, DC
Saturday, October 22, 2011

Lonnie Bunch was interviewed about the National Museum of African American History and Culture. He talked about planned exhibits and educational public spaces, plans to build the museum on the National Mall, and the importance of the African-American experience to U.S. history.

Updated: Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 11:39am (ET)

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