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Encore Q&A: Justice Stephen Breyer

Washington, DC
Saturday, October 1, 2011

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer talked about his newest book, Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge's View. In the book, Justice Breyer explains the workings of the judiciary in an attempt to gather support for the court and its role in American democracy.

Justice Breyer has been on the high court since 1994. Prior to that, he was a judge on the First Circuit Court of Appeals based in Boston. He previous books include Active Liberty: Interpreting Our Democratic Constitution, Breaking the Vicious Circle: Toward Effective Risk Regulation, and Regulation and its Reform.

Updated: Thursday, September 29, 2011 at 12:22pm (ET)

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