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Encore Q&A: Harold Holzer

Washington, DC
Saturday, August 18, 2012

Harold Holzer talks about his book "Lincoln President-Elect: Abraham Lincoln and the Great Secession Winter 1860-1861." In his book about the presidential transition period of Abraham Lincoln, Mr. Holzer traces Lincoln's actions in the four months between his 1860 election and his inauguration: a period when seven states seceded from the Union. Harold Holzer, co-chairman of the U.S. Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and vice chairman of the Lincoln Forum, has authored, co-authored, or edited over 30 books on the Lincoln era. This interview was conducted in the lobby of Washington's historic Willard Hotel, where President-elect Lincoln and his family resided in the days leading up to the 1861 inauguration.

Updated: Monday, August 6, 2012 at 12:56pm (ET)

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