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Encore Q&A: Edna Greene Medford

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 11, 2012

Edna Greene Medford discusses the state of Abraham Lincoln scholarship. Dr. Medford says Lincoln must be looked at in the context of his era. She responds to authors such as Thomas DiLorenzo and Lerone Bennett who have published books critical of Lincoln. She also discusses current day issues of racial descrimination, education, and the possibility of the first African American president.

Updated: Monday, January 30, 2012 at 12:51pm (ET)

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