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Encore Q&A: Douglas Brinkley

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 9, 2013

Douglas Brinkley talks about his book, "Cronkite," which chronicles the life of long time CBS Evening News anchorman Walter Cronkite, often referred to as "the most trusted man in America."

Brinkley discusses his research methods for the book which included access to the newsman’s private papers as well as interviews with over 150 people.

Updated: Thursday, January 31, 2013 at 1:20pm (ET)

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