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Encore Q&A: David Heidler & Jeanne Heidler

Washington, DC
Saturday, April 14, 2012

David and Jeanne Heidler discuss their biography "Henry Clay: The Essential American." Henry Clay was Speaker of the House and served in the Senate. He unsuccessfully ran for President five times. A founder of the Whig Party, he was known as the Great Compromiser. David and Jeanne Heidler have written numerous books together including "Daily Life in the Early American Republic," "Manifest Destiny," "Old Hickory's War," and "The War of 1812."

Updated: Wednesday, March 28, 2012 at 1:22pm (ET)

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