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Encore Q&A: Carol Highsmith

Washington, DC
Saturday, September 22, 2012

For the past 30 years, Carol Highsmith has been traveling the United States and documenting the country through her camera lens. In this program, she talks about and shows her photography including some from her project to photograph each state in the country. Highsmith also shows and discusses an earlier project to photograph the entire Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress in detail.

Updated: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 at 1:34pm (ET)

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