All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Edith Wharton & the "New Woman"

Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton

St. Augustine, Florida
Saturday, February 1, 2014

Edith Wharton was an American novelist of the early 20th century who was known for her depictions of the hypocrisies of upper-class society. In this talk at Flagler College, English professor Judith Burdan instead explores Wharton’s idea of the “new woman” in her book “The Custom of the Country.” The protagonist, Undine Spragg, is a determined yet ruthless “new woman” who uses men to gain power and wealth. 

Updated: Monday, February 3, 2014 at 11:31am (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Fashioning the New Woman 1890-1925
Sunday, July 28, 2013     

The Daughters of the American Revolution Museum exhibit, "Fashoning the New Woman: 1890 to 1925," details how women's clothing changed as women's roles in society changed during the progressive era. American History TV joined DAR Curator Alden O'Brien as she gave a tour to a small group to show examples beginning with elaborate 1890s bustle dresses and ending with flapper dresses and World War One Red Cross uniforms.

1920s Women's Magazines & Writers
Saturday     

American History TV traveled to the Library of Congress Kluge Center in Washington, DC, which was established in 2000 and endowed by philanthropist John W. Kluge. The center welcomes over 100 scholars every year to pursue their research interests at one of the world's largest libraries. We spoke with PhD candidate Sophie Oliver about the fashion, writing styles, and culture illustrated in the 1920s New Jersey magazine, "Charm," and what it reveals about women's social and political interests. 

Lectures in History: Modernizing the Home and Workplace
Saturday     

Vanderbilt University professor Sarah Igo talks about the societal shift that occurred during the early 20th century as as modernization impacted businesses and households. Igo focuses on the literary works of individuals such as Christine Frederick, proponent of home economics, and Frederick Winslow Taylor, who sought to improve industrial efficiency. 

The Civil War: Legacy of Henry Wirz
Saturday     

Author and history professor Michael Vorenberg discusses the legacy of Confederate Captain Henry Wirz, who was in charge of the Andersonville Prison Camp from March 1864 to his arrest in May 1865 for war crimes. Wirz was convicted and executed near the U.S. Capitol building.
 

The Civil War: Changing Military Strategy in 1864
Saturday     

Author Kristopher White describes the way the Union and Confederate Armies attempted to innovate during the final year of the war.

History Bookshelf: Documenting the Great Depression
Saturday     

Linda Gordon, author of “Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits,” discusses the Depression-era photographer’s personal life and the social and political content of her work.

Sleeping Car Porters & Civil Rights
Saturday     

A panel discusses the history and legacy of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, one of the first African American labor unions in the United States. Panelists explore the role of A. Philip Randolph, the labor and civil rights leader who helped organize the union, as well as the struggles of female members. The Association for the Study of African American Life and History hosted this event. 

Medical Experts & the JFK Assassination
Saturday     

Dr. Gary Aguilar describes different analyses of the JFK assassination that led to the single-shooter theory and Warren Report conclusion of Lee Harvey Oswald’s guilt.

House Select Committee on Assassinations & the CIA
Saturday     

Author and English Professor Joan Mellen explains the CIA’s involvement in the House Select Committee on Assassinations, which met in 1976 to investigate the JFK and King murders.

Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall
Sunday, October 19, 2014     

Historians and law professors met at the University of Baltimore Law School to discuss Mick Caouette’s film “Mr. Civil Rights: Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP.” They explored Marshall’s early law career as well as his work in the South to expand voting rights for African Americans. We also hear about his arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court, and how he became the first African American appointed to the highest court in the land.  

Share This Event Via Social Media
Book TV (late 2012)