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Economics, Class & the Founding of America

Continental Currency

Continental Currency

Kansas City, Missouri
Saturday, June 22, 2013

William Hogeland, author of the book “Founding Finance: How Debt, Speculation, Foreclosures, Protests, and Crackdowns Made Us a Nation," explains how conflicting views of economics and class among the founders influenced the debate over the Constitution. The Kansas City Public Library hosts this event.

Updated: Monday, June 24, 2013 at 10:04am (ET)

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