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Early 20th Century Harlem

Harlem Street Scene

Harlem Street Scene

New York City
Saturday, April 5, 2014

Architectural historian Barry Lewis discusses the history of Harlem’s buildings and people. Founded as a 17th century Dutch outpost, Harlem—a bastion of African American culture—was built up in the Reconstruction Era as a white middle class neighborhood. African Americans moved into Harlem around the turn of the century, and the city became segregated on north-south lines. 

Updated: Sunday, April 6, 2014 at 11:28am (ET)

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